IRVINE VALLEY COLLEGE

FOCUSED ACCREDITATION MIDTERM REPORT

November 1, 2001

 

Presented to

The Western Association of Schools and Colleges

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Orange County Community College District

Irvine Valley College

5500 Irvine Center Drive

Irvine, California 92618

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Dorothy Fortune, Thomas A. Fuentes, Dave Lang, Marcia Milchiker, Nancy Padberg

Donald P. Wagner, John S. Williams


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

STATEMENT OF REPORT REVIEW AND APPROVAL....................................

REPORT PREPARATION......................................................................................

FOCUSED MIDTERM REPORT...........................................................................

I.RESPONSE TO MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE VISITING TEAM................................

II.RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE VISITING TEAM BY STANDARD..............

Standard 1..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 2..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 3..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 4..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 5..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 6..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 7..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 8..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 9..........................................................................................................................................

Standard 10........................................................................................................................................

III.RESPONSE TO PLANNING AGENDA ITEMS IDENTIFIED IN THE LAST SELF STUDY REPORT������

REFERENCES.......................................................................................................

 

 


Statement of Report REVIEW AND APPROVAL

The Irvine Valley College Focused Accreditation Midterm Report has been reviewed for accuracy and validated by the college's governance leadership and was approved by the South Orange County Community College District Board of Trustees on October 29, 2001.

 

 

 

___________________________________________

Dr. Raghu P. Mathur, College President

 

 

___________________________________________

Dr. Richard A. Jones, Interim Chancellor

 

 

___________________________________________���������������������������������

Nancy Padberg, President, Board of Trustees��������������������������������������������������

 

 


REPORT PREPARATION

 

As requested by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Irvine Valley College submits this focused midterm report.This report addresses all recommendations made by the visiting team during the last comprehensive visit, which occurred on October 27 through October 29, 1998.For each such recommendation, this report provides a description of the College's response, an assessment of the progress made in fulfilling the team's recommendation, and a plan for the activities expected to be completed before the next comprehensive self study and evaluation visit.

 

This report also addresses the planning agenda items identified in the self study report prepared prior to the visit.

 

In January of 1999, following the last comprehensive visit, the college president initiated the process for preparing this midterm report by distributing the recommendations of the visiting evaluation team to all college faculty and staff.During the spring of 2001, the college president again distributed these recommendations to the college leadership council, requesting that each member work with faculty and staff in developing responses.The college leadership council consists of:

 

Raghu P. Mathur, college president

David E. Anderson, Jr., director, emeritus institute, community and contract education

Glenn R. Roquemore, vice president of instruction

Helen Locke, director, student affairs

Armando R. Ruiz, vice president of student services

John Edwards, director, admissions, records and enrollment services

Beth Mueller, college budget manager

Tim Shaw, director, foundation

Susan Corum, dean, business and social sciences

Becky Thomas, director, child development center

Ruth Jacobson, dean, mathematics, sciences, and engineering

Tran Hong, director, technology services

Jess Craig, dean, students and counseling

Larry DeShazer, director, center for applied competitive technologies

Susan Cooper, dean, advanced technology

Nelson Cayabyab, director, facilities and maintenance

Howard Gensler, dean, humanities, fine arts and library services

Owen Kreza, chief of police

Ann Doty, director, research, planning and grants

Mark Godding, public information officer

Donna Sneed, director, economic and resource development

Marilyn Radenovic, executive assistant to the president

 

Leadership council members disseminated the visiting evaluation team's recommendations to the faculty and/or staff, as appropriate, in their respective units and sought input from all stakeholders within the college.Members of the college leadership council obtained and submitted the input to the accreditation chair, Professor Ray Chandos.The chancellor was invited to provide input on Standard 10 matters relating to governance, leadership, and the Board of Trustees, and his input was received by the accreditation chair as well.

 

During early summer of 2001, the accreditation chair distributed the recommendations to the leaders of all college governance groups, requesting that they solicit input from their respective constituencies:

 

Lewis Long, president, academic senate

Nelson Cayabyab, president, classified management council

Mashid Hajir, president, classified senate

Mary Williams, president, district C.S.E.A. (California State Employees Association) chapter

Lee Haggerty, president, district faculty association

Dan Leibson, president, associated students of Irvine Valley College

 

In August of 2001, the recommendations of the visiting evaluation team were published on the Internet, and an accreditation workshop was held during the college's fall flex week.

 

In September of 2001, the accreditation chair assembled all responses received into a draft midterm report and published it on the Internet for general review and comment.The chair also attended the regular meetings of the president's council to report on preparation of the midterm report and to collect further input.Subsequently, a draft of the midterm report was provided to the chancellor and all members of the Board of Trustees for their review and comment.All input and comments received from all sources were reviewed by the chair and incorporated into a final version of the report, which was transmitted to the Board of Trustees for approval on October 29, 2001.

 

 


FOCUSED MIDTERM REPORT

 

I.RESPONSE TO MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE VISITING TEAM

 

1.Governance and Administration

 

The district and its colleges should immediately and persistently take steps to insure the board limits itself to appropriate policy-setting roles as defined by the commission and by trustee associations (ACCT, CCCT), should assess the leadership issues at Irvine Valley College and take appropriate measures, and should foster a constructive, professional, ethical dialogue among faculty groups to clarify roles and responsibilities.(Standard 10)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendation

 

The Board of Trustees of the SOCCCD fully understands its policy-setting roles.The Board has participated in several training sessions including one in 1999 conducted jointly by the Community College League of California and the state academic senate.In addition, most of the board members attended college academic and classified retreat in-service sessions that examined relationships and roles for mutual effectiveness.Step-by-step constructive and professional relations are improving with the Board clearly supporting Irvine Valley College leadership while also considering carefully the recommendations of the various shared governance groups.

 

In January 2001, to address a vacancy due to the illness of the chancellor, the Board engaged a qualified consultant full time to serve as acting chancellor.A former three-time chancellor and college president was appointed full time in this capacity through PPL.That individual has been working to improve the Board's effectiveness in communications and relationships with all college constituencies as well as working toward strengthening the basis of trust among the constituency groups.Progress has been made and is continuing to be made regularly.Although constituencies may be more welcomed and involved, timing has a bearing.For example, extended negotiations currently are progressing with CSEA (California State Employees Association).Contract negotiations will begin with the faculty association later this year.Negotiations typically create heightened tensions; nonetheless, amenable relations continue and CSEA representatives continue to participate on the various shared governance, constituency-based committees.For example, in the executive hiring process for a vice chancellor of educational services, the constituency based screening committee, including CSEA and faculty representation, processed the applicant pool, chose finalists, interviewed nine candidates, and recommended finalists unranked to the Board of Trustees.The Board and acting chancellor moved forward to interview the finalists recommended.

 

The Board has been focusing on policy formulation and revision.In response to the requirements of the state chancellor of community colleges, the Board has conducted a review of required board policies to insure that these policies meet the state chancellor's minimum conditions.At this time, the district is in compliance with the state chancellor's minimum conditions.

 

The Board and chancellor have evaluated the leadership of the college president and have found it satisfactory as evidenced by the continued renewal of his contract.In addition, the Board has filled all college administrative and managerial leadership positions in accordance with the recommendations of the president.Furthermore, the chancellor and the Board have continued to support the recommendations of the college president for the appointment of faculty and classified staff.In addition, earlier this year the Board awarded the college president a salary bonus of $5,000 for exemplary service.These actions demonstrate confidence in and support for the management of the college by the college president and the administrative team.As a further example of support and confidence, in March 2001, the board assigned the college president additional duties as acting vice chancellor of educational services for the district.In addition, it should be noted that the college president attended the president's academy of the American Association of Community Colleges in 1999, attended the Institute for Educational Management at Harvard University in 2000, and presented a paper by invitation on the role of leadership in educational management at the Oxford Roundtable Conference, Oxford University, in 2001.

 

The president's council consists of the vice presidents of instruction and student services, the college budget manager, the director of the foundation, the director of research, planning, and grants, the public information officer, as well as the leadership of all governance groups, including the academic senate, the classified senate, the district faculty association, CSEA, and the classified management and the associated students of Irvine Valley College (ASIVC) along with individuals who report directly to the college president, including the staff development officer, the affirmative action officer, and the multicultural/diversity officer.The president's council regularly discusses college issues in an open and participatory fashion, and has set a tone of enhanced communication and cooperation among all concerned parties, particularly through their participation in the institutional planning processes, including planning retreats.Upon the recommendation of the president's council and the approval of the Board of Trustees, the college has revised the vision and mission statements within the last year[1].

 

B.Planned Activities

 

Under the leadership of the chancellor and the direction of the Board of Trustees, efforts will continue to define and clarify the roles of the Board of Trustees, the administration, and the faculty in the decision-making process.

 

2. Financial Resources and Allocations

 

The district should adopt the October 19, 1998, Budget Development Guidelines, should implement the principles set forth in the document over a significant period of time, and through the colleges should take strong measures to generate apportionment through FTES growth and enrollment management.(Standard 9)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

The Board of Trustees adopted the October 19, 1998 budget development guidelines[2] on July 31, 2000.The guidelines direct the deputy chancellor to monitor the college budgets so that there is no negative balance at year end.

 

The college finished the 1998-1999 fiscal year with a negative ending balance of $143,000.In response to the Commission's concerns, a new college budget manager position was created to provide full-time oversight of the college's budget.This position was filled in May 1999.The budget manager's duties[3] include implementing the budget development guidelines.The college finished the last two fiscal years, 1999-2000 and 2000-2001, with positive ending balances of approximately $500,000.The district's 2001-2002 budget includes a 6.5% reserve for economic uncertainties.

 

The district has operated under basic aid status for the past two years.The Board has directed that excess revenues over program-based funding be used for one-time expenses only, and not for ongoing expenses such as salary increases.The excess funds from basic aid over what would have been received from program based funding have been used to retire the COPS[4] (certificates of participation) debt early resulting in substantial savings to the district.During 2000-2001, the Board allocated each college $500,000 for renovation and/or construction of athletic/sports/park facilities, plus another $500,000 to each college for science equipment and/or laboratory renovation, TV equipment and/or studio renovation (not computers)[5].For 2001-2002, the Board has set aside funds as a match for construction of new buildings at both colleges.

 

Through the office of the college budget manager, several structural safeguards have been developed to insure careful scrutiny of the college's general operating funds and avert negative yearend balances.Monthly financial reports are distributed to each budget area, with accounts demonstrating concern circled and highlighted.Deficit accounts are placed on a list and closely monitored until the deficits are resolved. If a problem is not resolved in a reasonable amount of time, the budget manager contacts the appropriate dean, director, or manager to work out a resolution.

 

The budget manager does not permit budget transfers from salary or benefit accounts to supply or operating accounts in the unrestricted general fund.Any salary transfer is closely examined to insure that sufficient funds will be available for all future payrolls.The budget manager apprises the college community of any budgetary concerns through her presence at college leadership council meetings, meetings of the President's Council, and the regular meetings of the Financial Advisory Committee. The district also purchased a new financial accounting software package in 1999.This new system does not allow requisitions to be processed unless sufficient funds are available for the purchase.

 

The college has also taken several measures to strengthen enrollment and increase FTES while maintaining its commitment to its legislated mission as a comprehensive California community college.

 

The office of student development has expanded its outreach activities: student assessments at local high schools, including Woodbridge, Irvine, Tustin, and S.E.L.F. continuation high school; a successful senior day event on campus with seniors from Irvine, Woodbridge, Tustin, University, Mission Viejo, Century, and El Toro high schools; an applied psychology course offered at S.E.L.F. continuation high school; KinderCaminata event with 32 elementary schools - seven of them new - 770 students, 118 teachers, aides, and parent volunteers participating; and a conference for high school counselors with nine high schools represented.

 

The college has taken steps to expedite the admission and registration processes for students.Students may now apply for admission and schedule required assessment testing on line.A web-based product launched in September 2001 has also reduced the turnaround time for transcript requests.

 

During the fall semester of 2001, the college offered a schedule of classes that, if filled, will produce

8% growth.Curriculum has been added in areas of great demand, and class sections have been added in response to waiting lists.Weekend course offerings have been increased, as well as the number of 8-week classes.

 

In response to community needs, the college has approved six new instructional programs: Digital Graphics Applications, Digital Graphic Design, Digital Publishing, Retail Management, Spreadsheets, and Web Page Authoring. These programs were approved by the Board of Trustees on March 26, 2001.

 

Despite increasing competition for students since 1998, the college has maintained its enrollment at approximately 7,600 FTES.In fact, enrollment (headcount) for the summer 2001 semester is up by 6% compared with summer 2000, and up by 7% for the fall 2001 semester as compared with fall of 2000.

 

B.Planned Activities

 

The Board has identified 2% growth in FTES at both colleges as a goal for the upcoming year.It appears that for the fall semester of 2001, IVC enrollment satisfies this goal.

 

A web-based registration product allowing students to enroll conveniently over the Internet was pilot tested during the fall semester of 2001 and is planned for full implementation in the spring of 2002. Over the last three years, the college has faced increasing competition for students, including from the nearby 11,000-student campus of Santiago Canyon College and numerous private and trade schools.

 

To more effectively manage enrollment growth, the college plans to offer more class sections in response to student demand as manifested in wait lists, develop new curriculum to serve varied student target populations, offer more classes and programs through distance delivery modes, conduct innovative student outreach efforts in the high schools, and promote our educational programs and student services through additional advertising and marketing.

 

3.Planning and Program Review

 

The college should re-energize its planning processes, implement meaningful program review processes in both instruction and student support services, increase its institutional research capability to provide meaningful data for informing the planning process, and tie budgeting, resource allocations, and future staffing priorities to these planning processes.(Standards 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9)

 

A. Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

New positions of director of research, planning, and grants and research analyst have been created and filled.The director's duties[6] include institutional effectiveness research, strategic planning, and assisting with and monitoring grants. In support of college programs, the director has completed a number of research projects and reports,[7]developed biannual retreats for campus leaders to guide the strategic planning process, and has written, assisted with, and monitored many grant proposals.Surveys of students have been conducted to support program review and the marketing of the college, and to follow-up IVC graduates from 1998 to 2000.Local businesses have been surveyed to assess the education and skills required of employees.The office of research, planning and grants maintains a website at http://www.ivc.edu/rpg/index.htm.

 

This year, the director serves on the Research and Planning (RP) Group of the state chancellor's office, the Workforce and Economic Development Advisory Committee (WEDAC), and several community boards.

 

In coordination with the college, the district has prepared a comprehensive educational and facilities master plan[8].This plan, adopted by the Board of Trustees in October 2001, provides the necessary data and philosophical foundation upon which the instructional and support facility needs of the college can be addressed and met in the next ten years.The plan guides action on capital expenditures, the effective use of technology, personnel needs, and budgeting for the college.

 

Processes for conducting review of both academic programs and student services have been developed and approved by the administration and academic senate[9], [10], [11].The program review process provides detailed data on student access, student success, staffing, governance, community involvement, and resource needs for each program.

 

Schedules for review of academic and student services programs have been adopted[12], and program review is proceeding according to that schedule. The following programs were reviewed during the 2000-2001 academic year: athletics, biology, chemistry, history, mathematics, computer information science/office information systems, psychology, speech, cross cultural center, disabled students (DSP&S), extended opportunity program and services (E.O.P.S.), and the veterans and scholarships programs under the financial aid office, with results expected to be forwarded to the academic senate in November 0f 2001.

 

The college president has established a process for developing a 5-year strategic plan covering the years 2001-2006[13].The revised strategic planning process provides for development of the next five-year strategic plan by seven focus groups under the direction of a strategic planning steering committee (the president's council), culminating in college-wide review and final approval by the college president.

 

The college's vision and mission statements were revised during the spring of 2001 under the leadership of the president's council with facilitation by the office of research, planning, and grants, and subsequently approved by the Board of Trustees.

 

C.Planned Activities

 

The following programs will undergo program review during the 2001-2002 academic year:accounting and finance, drafting, English, manufacturing, physical sciences, political science, theater arts, writing center, reading center, international students center, admissions and records, matriculation, and re-entry/women's center.

 

The approved strategic planning process calls for development of action plans and implementation strategies for the seven focus areas: college-wide, administrative services, business services, facilities, instruction, student services, and technology.The resulting strategic plan will thus provide data to guide future decisions involving budgeting, resource allocation, and staffing.

 

The follow-up survey of graduates will again be conducted to assess where IVC graduates have gone, how many have continued in further education or have become employed, their earning status, and their opinions about the IVC educational experience. The survey will also provide an opportunity for graduates to re-engage with the IVC campus as alumni volunteers and donors.

 

 

II.RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE VISITING TEAM BY STANDARD

 

Standard 1

 

None.

 

Standard 2

 

It is recommended that the college and district reaffirm their commitment to diversity and non-discrimination.(Standard 2.6)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

In June 2001, the Board of Trustees adopted a new board Policy, BP 4000.4[14]on diversity and non-discrimination.This policy was reviewed by the college prior to approval, and reaffirms the district's commitment to provide a quality education and work environment to all individuals.

 

C.Planned Activities

 

The college and the district plan to implement the new BP 4000.4.

 

Standard 3

 

The college should re-energize its planning processes, implement meaningful program review processes in both instruction and student support services, increase its institutional research capability to provide meaningful data for informing the planning process, and tie budgeting, resource allocations, and future staffing priorities to these planning processes.(Standards 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9)

 

Please see response to item I.3, above, page 10.

 

Standard 4

 

The 1998 accreditation team joins the 1992 team to recommend that the college develop and implement a comprehensive program review policy.(A.1, A.3, D.1)

 

Please see response to item I.3, above, page 10.

 

The team recommends that the administration in partnership with the academic senate resolve the issues of timeliness and levels of involvement related to curriculum development and review processes.(D.1-8) (See also Standard 10)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

Before 2000, the faculty chairperson of the college's committee on courses, appointed by the academic senate, was compensated for curriculum work by stipend.Upon the request of the academic senate and the recommendation of the college president, the chancellor approved compensation by reassigned time for the chair beginning in July of 2000.Currently, the chair is compensated at a rate of 6 lecture hour equivalents (LHE) of reassigned time per semester.(A full contractual load for faculty is 15 LHE.)

 

During the 2000-2001 academic year, the committee on courses approved 6 new instructional programs, 14 revised programs, 45 new courses; 104 revised courses including 81 technical changes, and 40 deleted courses.The newly added programs are Digital Graphics Applications, Digital Graphic Design, Digital Publishing, Retail Management, Spreadsheets, and Web Page Authoring. These curriculum additions/revisions were approved by the Board of Trustees on March 26, 2001 and are being offered during the 2001-2002 academic year.

 

B.Planned Activities

 

Currently the administration and the academic senate are working together under the established process to manage curriculum in a timely fashion.This is expected to continue[15].

 

Standard 5

 

The college should immediately move forward with the implementation of program review of all student services, actively involving students in the process.(Standard 5.10)

 

Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

During the fall semester of 1999, the calendar for program review of student services and student development was forwarded to the academic senate.Following suggested revisions, the calendar was again forwarded in the spring of 2001 and accepted by the senate.Working with managers and academic senate representatives, the vice president of student services revised the program review model for student services programs, which will now include student satisfaction surveys[16].

 

The following student services programs were reviewed during the 2000-2001 academic year: disabled students (DSP&S), extended opportunity program and services (E.O.P.S.), and the veterans and scholarships programs under the financial aid office, with final results expected to be forwarded to the academic senate in November of 2001.

 

B.Planned Activities

 

Student services will continue to undergo program review following the adopted six-year program review cycle.�� During the 2001-2002 program review cycle, the oversight committee will develop a calendar to guide the programs' timelines.

 

Standard 6

 

None.

 

Standard 7

 

None.

 

Standard 8

 

The college should implement the action plan found in its 1996-2001 strategic plan to develop predictable funding to support, maintain, and systematically replace technology and other instructional equipment.(Standard 8.4)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

The position of dean of advanced technology has been created and was filled in January of 2001.The dean's duties and responsibilities[17] include the acquisition, maintenance, and replacement of computing and other instructional equipment.During 2001, the college combined over $1.2 million from a variety of funding sources from the next three-year period to acquire computing and other equipment, including 385 new computers, serving all areas of instruction.This will result in upgrading over 75% of the computers on campus, and adding 23 data projectors, as well as new printers, data servers, network equipment, digital cameras, videocassette recorders, and video monitors.

 

C.Planned Activities

 

The institutional technology committee is preparing a resolution to present to the administration requesting a steady revenue allocation from the general fund for technology.

 

Standard 9

 

The district should adopt the October 19, 1998, Budget Development Guidelines, should implement the principles set forth in the document over a significant period of time, and through the colleges should take strong measures to generate apportionment through FTES growth and enrollment management.(Standard 9)

 

A.Description of Response

 

Please see response to item I.2 above, page 7.

 

Standard 10

 

The board should review and reevaluate board policies and processes for assessing board performance, including but not limited to the inappropriate senior executive hiring policy and the board's ethics policy, should delegate all non-policy issues to the chief executive officer, his team, and the established governance decision-making processes, and should cease involvement in the direct management of the colleges and district. (Standards 10.A.3, 10.A.4, 10.A.5, and 10.A.7)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

Board policies have been under continual review and revision.

 

Increasingly, IVC has functioned as an autonomous unit within the district.The various shared governance committees are functioning at the district level with full participation by IVC constituencies.These include, but are not limited to, budget (district resource allocation council (DRAC)), docket, chancellor's cabinet, and master plan steering committee.��

 

With regard to executive hiring policies, the Board of Trustees has been following standard practices, limiting its interviewing to finalists for those executive positions that sit with the board in closed sessions - presidents, chancellor, and vice chancellors.This in fact is common practice in California community college districts and in some other western states.

 

The only portion of its procedures that differ from common practices is that of including the vice president candidates for interviews by the Board.The reality is that the four vice president positions on the two college campuses have been filled through conventional practices whereby shared governance based representative screening committees have selected interviewees from the applicant pools and then passed on to the college presidents the names of the individuals the committees recommended as fully acceptable for the positions.In all cases, the Board has approved the recommendations of the presidents and chancellor without requiring interviews by the Board.However, the Board has the authority in the discharge of its executive oversight and policy-making roles also to interview vice president candidates should it choose to do so.For this reason, the wording includes the option of board interviews for vice presidents in addition to vice chancellors, presidents, and chancellor.

 

Furthermore, the hiring process for a vice chancellor of educational services was completed recently.A constituency committee screened all applications, selected interviewees, interviewed nine candidates and submitted finalists to the acting chancellor and Board of Trustees.They then interviewed those finalists and ultimately hired the vice chancellor.The process for selecting a new, permanent chancellor is underway.It, too, will include a representative screening committee.

 

B.Planned Activities

 

The chancellor and the Board of Trustees plan to continue to review and evaluate their roles and performance in an ongoing manner.

 

District leadership should assess the issues of leadership and of the relationship between faculty and staff with the administration at Irvine Valley College and should then develop appropriate steps to address these issues.(10.B.3 & 10.B.5)

 

Please see response to item I.1, above, page 6.

 

Representatives of all the formally recognized constituent groups (trustees, chief executive officer, administrators, faculty senates and union, classified senates and union, and student government) must come together soon.Their task should be to determine how they will reduce the hostility, mistrust, cynicism and despair that plague the institution currently.The team feels strongly that all players need to cease their negativism and focus on constructive steps toward building a new future.(Standards 10.A.3, 10.A.5, 10.B.1, 10.B.6, 10.B.7, 10.B.8, 10.B.9, 10.B.10, 10.C.1)

 

A.Description of Response and Progress Made Toward Team's Recommendations

 

All recognized groups within the district are working together in a professional and respectful manner.Agreement varies and differences have a formal avenue for expression and action.Collegiality and shared governance are functioning to serve the academic community and both campuses are operating consistent with the delivery of a forward moving educational mission.

 

For example, at this writing, national advertising is underway for the chancellor position.Applicant screening by a representative committee will begin at the end of October 2001.In July 2001, the Board conducted an evaluation session for the acting chancellor, which also included aspects of board self-evaluation.Board meeting agendas are reviewed, modified, and developed by a constituency group at �docket� meetings, followed by the same representative group, called the chancellor's cabinet, addressing a breadth of issues.

 

The district faculty association (bargaining unit) and the college academic senates hold liaison meetings.The college president now meets with academic senate officers every other week as their schedules permit, and with the classified staff and student representatives as needed.

 

Even though the academic senate continues to participate in the collegiate decision-making process, the senate president has provided some comments to the contrary.Although these comments from the academic senate president purport to represent the academic senate, the senate never approved these comments.The college president has provided a response to these comments[18].

 

B.Planned Activities

 

The chancellor's cabinet and the president's council along with the leadership of various governance groups seem committed to resolving their differences in the best interests of students, taxpayers, and the community.These efforts are expected to continue.

 

III.RESPONSE TO PLANNING AGENDA ITEMS IDENTIFIED IN THE LAST SELF STUDY REPORT

 

STANDARD ONE: Institutional Mission

 

1.1The college will develop measurable ways to determine if the Strategic Plan is consistent with the mission statement.

 

The goals of the Strategic Plan are evaluated each year by the president's council and the executive council to ensure that they are consistent with the college's mission statement.

STANDARD TWO: Institutional Integrity

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

STANDARD THREE: Institutional Effectiveness

 

3.1The college will review its strategic plan to include a research component and a research agenda to assist in the evaluation of the plan's initiatives.

 

Please see response to item 3.7 below, page 18.

 

3.2 The college will employ a dean of research, planning and resource develop�ment in an effort to provide stronger support in these areas.

 

The college has created and filled the position of director of research, planning, and grants as of August 1, 1999.The director has completed a number of research and planning projects supporting college programs.[19]A new position of director of economic and resource development was also created and filled to provide stronger support in the area of resource development.[20]

 

3.3The college will continue to implement and revise its program review process and establish outcome measures.

 

The process for review of instructional programs was completed in the fall of 1999.Since then, faculty have been educated about this process each semester through workshops held during flex week.Student performance and attitudes have been measured as outcomes, and the results used to provide substantive information to the faculty program review teams and to guide modifications to the program review instrument itself.

 

Please see response to item I.3.A above, page 10.

 

3.4The college will publish and disseminate outcomes of its planning and evaluation efforts through appropriate means including the college's web page.

 

The college publishes and disseminates the outcomes of its planning and evaluation efforts through bi-annual retreats of shared governance groups, email, posting on the college's web page at http://www.ivc.edu/rpg/planning.htm, president's council, meetings between deans and faculty, and presentations to the academic senate.The college president also presents the planning related accomplishments of the previous year at the college-wide breakfast meetings held at the beginning of fall and spring semesters.[21]

 

3.5The college will continue to implement its program review process and monitor resulting action plans in order to assure improvements.

 

The college conducted the academic program reviews during the 2000-2001 academic year.A total of eight academic programs were evaluated, and more than 2,200 students surveyed using a Scantron form.[22]At the conclusion of the initial year of instructional program review, members of faculty review teams and the program review oversight committee recommended improvements to both the process and the program review instrument itself.

 

3.6The college will continue to involve all of its constituencies in defining and con�ducting the planning process while broadly disseminating both the process and its results through the shared governance mechanisms.

 

Leaders of every campus governance group are regularly contacted in person, via phone, via email, or in meetings and their members invited to participate in retreats.Creation of the college vision statement illustrates the current process.The campus community was advised, involved in constructing the statement, discussing its contents, and rewriting it as necessary.The vision statement was revised during the spring 2001 semester through collaboration of all governance groups.

 

3.7 The college will continue to evaluate its strategic plan for possible modification, as needed, and determine whether it should focus on a more limited number of priorities.

 

As the 1996-2001 strategic plan came to its conclusion, multiple efforts have been made to produce a subsequent strategic plan: drafting a process for developing the successor strategic plan (office of research, planning, and grants); discussion by the academic senate and the college president; consideration by the president's council; final approval by the college president; opportunities for contributions to the goals and objectives of the new strategic plan by the campus community through multiple avenues; and a campus leadership retreat in April of 2001 to bring departmental priorities to the proposed activities.

 

The revised strategic planning process[23] provides for development of the next five-year strategic plan by seven focus groups under the direction of a strategic planning steering committee (the president's council), culminating in college-wide review and final approval by the college president.Through this process, the college will evaluate the antecedent strategic plan for appropriate content and scope in preparing the successor plan.

 

3.8The college will continue to clearly document achievements by disseminating status reports of the annual review of the strategic plan to ensure that faculty, staff and administrators are aware of current institutional goals.

 

Please see response to item 3.4, above, page 17.

 

3.9The college will develop a plan for wide dissemination of its accomplishments in all areas of its operation.

 

Please see response to item 3.4, above, page 17 .

 

3.10The college will conduct a comprehensive community needs assessment to deter�mine the public's perception of the institution and educational needs of the com�munity at large.

 

This has been addressed through the current education and facilities master planning process.

 

3.11Through the shared governance mechanism, the college will continue to review its institutional research efforts, evaluation processes, institutional plans, and planning processes, making changes where necessary.

 

Under the direction of the college president, the director of research, planning and grants regularly conducts a review and evaluation of the institutional research and planning processes based on feedback from the governance groups, president's council, and the college community as appropriate.

 

STANDARD FOUR: Educational Programs

 

4.1The college will continue to take the necessary steps to ensure the continuation of part�nerships to meet the needs of the business community.

 

The college has partnered with the Ascolta Training Company to provide college credit and the associated training for Cisco.IVC has also partnered with Cisco in developing a Cisco Academy as part of the college instructional program.

 

The college continues to develop advisory committees with representatives from business and industry. Currently, advisory committees exist for programs such as administration of justice, early childhood education, business management, CIM (computer integrated management), laser technology, electronics, engineering, and fitness specialist.

 

The college is involved in workforce development activities in Orange County.The director of economic development is a member of the Orange County Workforce Partners Group coordinating board. This group consists of business leaders and educators involved in developing a business strategy for workforce development.

 

In addition, the college has conducted a study of the workforce preparation needs of the businesses and industries located in the Irvine Spectrum.The director of the emeritus institute, community and contract education is currently using the results of this workforce preparation needs assessment to develop an action plan to strengthen the college's contract education program.

 

4.2The college will seek funding and an institutional priority to hire more classified staff to support the existing programs.

 

Since October 1998, additional classified staff have been hired in the following areas: instruction, student services, fiscal services, maintenance and operations, and the office of the president.

 

The college continues to support the classified hiring committee, which is chaired by the college budget manager.More so than ever, the hiring priorities have been expanded to include needs throughout the college.These priorities are being addressed as funds become available.

 

4.3The college will explore and expand the use of non-traditionally delivered instructional methods such as technology and media-driven course offerings in order to offer courses and programs to more students with fewer facilities.

 

During the past two years, the college has moved from a philosophy of distance learning to one of distributed learning.This learning model emphasizes the ability of instructors and students to interact in various modes that are not dependent on time, geographical location, or physical space.Students have a variety of options that enable them to take courses that fit their time and location schedule as well as their preferred style of learning.

 

The three learning modes in use at IVC for the past two years have been: online courses (Internet) using Blackboard course management software as well as other online products; live interactive cable television courses on local cable channel 33; and telecourses provided by the Intelecom Consortium.From late 1999 through 2001, instructors received stipends to develop and teach these non-traditionally delivered courses, resulting in an increase in course offerings.

 

Non-Traditionally Delivered Courses, Fall 1999 through Summer 2001

Telecourses

35

Live Interactive Television Courses

22

Online Courses

57

 

In addition, 25 additional classrooms are being installed with data projectors and computer workstations to allow faculty to access the Internet and use the campus network for demonstrations, simulations, and mediated instruction.Instructors are increasingly using materials from publishers that include CD-ROM and Internet accessible materials that students can access from their homes, in self-instructional computer labs, and in teaching labs.Assistance is also planned for instructors to learn more about instructional design of online and television courses, as well as technologies to assist students with special learning needs.

 

A web-based registration product to support enrollment in these programs was pilot-tested during the fall semester of 2001 after a year of testing and improvements.A new student assessment-scheduling module designed to streamline the application process is also undergoing final testing.

 

4.4The college will continue to monitor and im�plement new strategies to strengthen the transfer rate on an ongoing basis.

 

The Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program has provided an opportunity for the college to focus on student transfer.During the 2000-2001 academic year, $200,000 was allocated from PFE to address the five goals of the program.Most of the funded proposals targeted improving student transfer rates and student success.The office of research, planning, and grants has implemented accountability measures to determine the success of each funded proposal.

 

As a result of the PFE program, the college and district have improved the student tracking mechanism to allow more accurate counting of student transfers.A new transcript production module was also implemented in August of 2001.This module assists transfer students by producing more student-friendly and timely transcripts.At the close of the Spring 2000 semester, over 1,500 transfer ready students were mailed invitations to a transfer workshop.Efforts will continue to provide transfer workshops to help students complete the application process for four-year institutions.On May 3, 2001 the college president, the vice president of student services, and the dean of students attended a transfer related workshop hosted by the president of California State University at Long Beach.

 

4.5The college will document the computer literacy of the IVC student population and move forward with implementing computer literacy as a graduation requirement based on the study performed.

 

The college has recently created and filled the position of director of research, planning, and grants.This new office will be responsible for conducting this survey.When the results become available, the office of instruction will work with the academic senate to develop a graduation requirement.

 

4.6The college will continue to implement the program review process in the 1998-99 academic year.

 

The college conducted the first academic program reviews during the 2000-2001 academic year.Eight academic programs were evaluated.The program review committee plans to evaluate nine programs during the 2001-2002 academic year, including at least two student services programs.

 

4.7The college will move forward with its efforts to offer television courses on Channel 33 and hybrid and online courses via the Internet.

 

IVC has been offering telecourses through Intelecom (please see response to item 4.3 above, page 19) since fall of 1998.In addition, IVC broadcasts educational programming from the satellite such as NASA programs and fine arts classics, as well as live interactive courses on local cable channel 33.Telecourses offered since 1998 have concentrated in the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, sociology, management, and marketing.Courses taught interactively on television have included art history, world music, fable and folktales, women in literature, principles of accounting, C programming, C++ programming, introduction to personal computer applications, real estate salesman's license preparation, criminal procedures and BASIC programming.

 

The number of courses taught on the Internet or taught with Internet components has increased each year since 1999.The introduction of stipends has motivated faculty to develop courses that accommodate online learners.The highest concentration of online courses occurs in the areas of accounting, computer science, psychology, and music.Student enrollments in online courses from fall of 1999 through spring of 2001 totaled 1719.

 

Since November 2000, IVC has been in negotiations with the city of Irvine, the Irvine Unified School District, and Cox Communications over the college's usage of cable channels.Cox Communications would like to displace IVC from channel 33 and use that channel for more lucrative programming.The city of Irvine must make this decision.Present discussions might lead to moving IVC to channel 39 with the possibility of purchasing leased access to channel 97.While channels 33 and 39 are received only within the city of Irvine, channel 97 would give the college access to many additional students outside Irvine in south Orange County.

 

STANDARD FIVE: Student Support and Development

 

5.1The college will, through the shared governance policy, research the implementation of a policy of uniform operating hours for all student services.

 

Operating hours in the student services center have been changed in order to meet student demand and provide uniformity.All offices now open at 8:00 a.m. on Monday through Friday, including all of the offices on the first floor (admissions and records office, Americorps office, bursar's office, cafeteria, CalWORKs, disabled students services (DSP&S), extended opportunity program and services (E.O.P.S.), financial assistance, health and wellness center, international student office, multicultural center, and student transition and re-entry (STAR) center.All of the offices on the first floor remain open until 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday.The counseling center on the second floor remains open until 8:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday.On Friday, the offices close at 3:00 p.m.

 

5.2The college will consider an international student advisory committee to develop a comprehensive program of services commensurate with the needs of this population.

 

The college has not developed an international student advisory committee, but has instead developed a set of recommendations[24] to address the needs of international students.These recommendations are incorporated in the district's planning goals. Some of these recommendations have already been implemented, including the completion of four articulation agreements waiving TOEFL (test of English as a foreign language) scores for graduates of certain language schools, and the initiation of counseling services designed for international students.

 

The financial aid office has also implemented several alternative loan programs.While not as desirable as the federal loan programs, these programs make available much needed financial assistance to international students.

 

5.3The college will research strategies for the secure handling of student transcripts from other colleges.

 

A fully secure method of transcript handling is now in place.A new imaging system and other improvements to the data storage and retrieval system now provide counselors and other authorized student services personnel with desktop access to student transcripts in a secure manner.

 

5.4The college will develop and implement procedures to ensure confidentiality and safety of student files.

 

Student files in the admissions and records office have been removed from non-secured areas and are now in full compliance with FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 34 C.F.R. Part 99) regulations.This office has also been secured in a more effective manner so as to greatly decrease walk-through traffic that formerly jeopardized the integrity of student records.

 

STANDARD SIX: Information and Learning Resources

6.1The library collection will increase by 28% per year over the next three years.

 

The library book collection has increased 19% from 1998 to 1999, by 19% from 1999 to 2000, and by 6% from 2000 to 2001 for a current total of 51,311 volumes.Expansion of the library's collection has been funded by a grant, the remainder of which will fund an estimated 2,500 additional volumes over the next year.

 

6.2The college will continue to emphasize the selection of materials, which are re�quired for library assignments, and materials that have a history of consistent cir�culation.

 

The library gives the highest priority to faculty recommended titles when selecting new library materials, and to titles that support classroom assignments.Materials that have a consistently high usage pattern are also given a preference.Circulation of library materials has increased by 33% as compared with three years ago.

 

6.3The college will strive to finalize district fi�nancial support for the development and acquisition of a common set of database reference tools.

 

New administration at both IVC and Saddleback are no longer convinced that the benefits of adopting a common set of database reference tools would justify the expense, which would have to be borne by the local library budget.Therefore, this issue needs further discussion and consideration.

 

6.4The college will develop a library and information technology services hand�book, posted on the IVC web site, to provide a single source of information about all information services provided to the students, faculty and staff.

 

Prior to July of 1999, the library was a part of library and information technology services.For several years during this time, a paper handbook describing all of the services of library and information technology was compiled and maintained.One section of this handbook described all of the services the library provided to students, faculty, and staff.After July 1999, the college was reorganized so that the library was no longer a part of information technology services.Information technology services then changed its name to advanced technology.Since then, advanced technology has posted on the IVC web site a description of all of its services at http://www.ivc.edu/infoserv/advtech/advtech.htm.A web page describing library services, including an online catalog, appears at http://www.ivc.edu/infoserv/library/library.html.

 

6.5The college will attempt to bring the library staffing to national standard levels and add appropriate clerical and technical staffing to the learning centers.

 

Since 1998, the library staff has grown by the addition of one half-time department secretary, and a significant increase in budget for student assistants.The library has a computer center for student access to the Internet, assignment-related research, and email communication with instructors and fellow students.Each student is assigned an email account.

 

Since the library has split off from advanced technology, it is no longer involved with the learning center.However, the library houses a large computer lab for student usage in conducting research, writing term papers, and communicating with faculty and students.

 

The following table compares library staffing with ALA (American Library Association) recommendations for colleges of this size:

 

type of staff

minimum ALA recommendation

excellent ALA recommendation

current IVC staffing

administrators

1

1

0.3

professional

7

9

3

technicians

7

12

4.75

other staff

6

11

0.5

total staff

21

33

8.55

 

The college will provide additional support staff as more resources become available.

 

6.6The college will develop a plan to hire a library director consistent with institutional hiring mechanisms and budgetary constraints.

 

The college will address this continuing need as additional resources become available.

 

6.7The college will strive to increase the library budget to meet the growing needs for acqui�sition, access and maintenance of traditional and non-traditional resources, in�cluding audiovisual materials.

 

The college will address these needs subject to availability of resources.

 

6.8The college will continue efforts to increase the access to information services provided by the library from other institutions, including U.C. Irvine.

 

The library belongs to the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), an electronic online union catalog of libraries (academic, public, and special) throughout the world, including U.C. Irvine.OCLC provides an interlibrary loan service among all of the member libraries.This interlibrary loan service allows IVC to provide students and faculty books and journal articles not held by the college library.

 

IVC now also accesses all University of California library catalogs through the Internet.

 

STANDARD SEVEN: Faculty and Staff

 

7.1The college will strive to involve all segments of the staff in the ongoing review of all personnel policies and procedures.

 

Ongoing opportunities for the review of personnel policies and procedures arise as faculty and staff serve on various hiring committees, and their input is sought and considered by the office of human resources and its affirmative action officer revising these policies and procedures.

 

STANDARD EIGHT: Physical Resources

 

8.1The college will develop a contingency plan for rental of temporary buildings or commercial space in the likely event that the state approval of future construction lags while student enrollment increases.

 

The college added two portable classrooms for the fall 2001 semester to support additional sections of classes. The two new classrooms will accommodate 120 students.A procedure is in place to purchase or lease additional DSA (Department of State Architect) approved portable classrooms when the need and budget permit.

 

8.2The college will renew its commitment to provide the best instructional equipment that limited funds will allow.

 

During 2001, the college combined over $1.2 million from a variety of funding sources over the next three-year period to acquire computing and other equipment, including 385 new computers, serving all areas of instruction.This will result in upgrading over 75% of the computers on campus, and adding 23 data projectors, as well as new printers, data servers, network equipment, digital cameras, videocassette recorders, and video monitors.

 

Instructional equipment funds for 2001-2002 have been blocked by a veto of the California governor.Efforts are underway statewide to restore these funds.Restored dollars will be used to purchase additional instructional equipment.

 

 

8.3The college will consider and evaluate suggestions that priority instructional equipment purchase requests be evaluated and funded before any general allocations of State Block Grant Funds are made.

 

This process is facilitated through the instructional council.

 

8.4.The college will make faculty more aware of the existence of a college equipment maintenance fund and the process for requesting funding for instructional equipment re�placement.

 

Previously funds for instructional construction projects came from the general or capital outlay funds.Funds for instructional furnishings such as desks, chairs, and marker boards came from budgets under instruction and student services.Now, these expenditures have been consolidated into a dedicated separate budget account under the department of facilities and maintenance.

 

8.5The college will give priority to increasing technical support staff assigned to instruc�tional laboratories as funds become available.

 

Staffing needs are identified and prioritized through the college classified hiring committee.The college has just concluded the employment process for a second full-time television production specialist, and the selected individual is expected to assume duties beginning January 1, 2002.

 

STANDARD NINE: Financial Resources

 

9.1The college's committee on budget and operations will continue to carefully monitor the state of the college's general operating funds.��

 

The committee on budget and operations has been replaced by the financial advisory committee (please see response to item 9.5 below, page 28) under the leadership of the college budget manager.Through the office of the college budget manager, several structural safeguards have been developed to insure careful scrutiny of the college's general operating funds.

 

Monthly financial reports are distributed to each budget area, with accounts demonstrating concern circled and highlighted.Deficit accounts are placed on a list and closely monitored until the deficits are resolved. If a problem is not resolved in a reasonable amount of time, the budget manager contacts the appropriate dean, director, or manager to work out a resolution.

 

The district purchased a new financial accounting software package in 1999.This new system does not allow requisitions to be processed unless sufficient funds are available for the purchase.

 

The budget manager does not permit budget transfers from salary or benefit accounts to supply or operating accounts in the unrestricted general fund.Any salary transfer is closely examined to insure that sufficient funds will be available for all future payrolls.

 

The budget manager apprises the college community of any budgetary concerns through her presence at college leadership meetings, meetings of the President's Council, and the monthly meetings of the financial advisory committee.

 

Although budget deficits were not a concern during fiscal year 2000-2001, the committee discussed the energy issue and budgeting for it, college facility needs, and a budget for projects such as office remodeling and installation of new doors.The committee also considered and recommended to the college president a new policy of rolling over unspent supply funds instead of returning these funds to the college general fund.The president's council adopted the new policy on a pilot basis for fiscal year 2001-2002.

 

9.2The college will retain a master plan architect to update the 1996 educational and facilities master plan on a five year cycle.

 

In September of 2000, the district's master plan steering committee was convened with the Maas Company (educational component) and tBP (the Blurock Partnership) Architect (facilities component).The district educational and facilities master plan was approved by the Board of Trustees on October 29, 2001.

 

9.3IVC will continue to maintain its part of the district five-year construction plan in a manner that reflects the facility construction priorities set forth in the college's educational and facilities master Plan.

 

The district five-year construction plan is reviewed annually and does reflect the college's educational and facilities master plan.After reviewing the master plan, the college submitted the following proposals for inclusion in the district five-year construction plan in May 2001:

 

performing arts/theater building

budget year 2003-2004

final project[25] proposal

business and technology innovation center

budget year 2004-2005

initial project proposal

fine arts building

budget year 2004-2005

initial project proposal

life sciences building

budget year 2007-2008

(not yet formally submitted)

 

9.4The college will clearly communicate the budget development process to the college community so that there is increased awareness of the manner in which the college is budgeted and managed.

 

Each spring the college budget manager distributes folders containing budget worksheets to each budget unit to complete for the upcoming fiscal year[26].These folders include materials needed for year-end and budget development, including a schedule of budget meetings and deadlines.This calendar was also distributed to over 60 staff members who attended the IVC business services workshop held on March 8, 2001.The distribution of these materials is communicated to the college community through the councils and committees on which the budget manager sits.

 

The budget manager also communicates the budget development process through the financial advisory committee, consisting of representatives of the entire college community, which meets monthly (please see item 9.5. below, page 28).The budget manager reports to the committee on the progress of the college budget, developments in the state budget, and proceedings of the district resource allocation committee.Written handouts and other information are provided to committee members.

 

At college-wide meetings held at the beginning and in the middle of each semester, the college budget manager gives a presentation on the college budget and financial issues.Workshops are also planned to assist college staff with the new Escape accounting software, travel and conference procedures, account code structure, timely deposits, and processing of payroll information.Development of a budget procedures manual is also planned.

 

9.5The college will continue to annually develop its operating budgets with the full participation of administrators, classified managers, faculty and staff.

 

The financial advisory committee was established in the fall of 1999.This committee meets monthly to discuss important financial issues, assist in the fair allocation of financial resources, and make recommendations for the development of the college budget.The committee consists of representatives from all governance groups.

 

college budget manager (chair)

1

administrators (vice presidents of instruction and student services, 2 deans)

4

faculty (3 academic senate appointees, 1 faculty association appointee)

4

classified staff (appointed by California School Employees Association)

1

classified staff (appointed by classified senate)

1

classified management (appointed by management council)

1

student (appointed by Associated Students of Irvine Valley College)

1

 

The committee's recommendations are forwarded for review by the president's council, which consists of representatives of all governance groups.The president's council forwards its recommendations to the executive council and the college president for final decision.

 

9.6The college will continue to work towards a goal of no audit exceptions, and will improve its response time to correct any audit exceptions identified.

 

The College budget manager has established operating procedures to avoid the occurrence of audit exceptions.As potential problems are identified, the budget area manager is notified, and procedures are implemented to avert an audit exception.

 

When an audit exception occurs, the area responsible is immediately notified, the auditor's recommendations are conveyed, and procedures are established to resolve the problem in a timely fashion.

 

The most recent audit stated that all of the recommendations from the previous year's audit had been implemented, and none of those recommendations were repeated.

 

9.7The college will continue to develop and strengthen the ability of the bursar's office to provide required support to college departments and programs.

 

The bursar's office has added an additional credit card machine to assist with the processing of students during heavy enrollment periods, and a procedure to collect library fines from students when the library is closed.The bursar's office now coordinates with the physical sciences department prior to the end of each semester for the collection of laboratory fines.

 

The bursar's office collects all payroll timesheets/cards and absence documents and forwards them to the district office.A workshop was held in March 2001 to inform the college community about the processing of payroll timecards to insure that all employees are paid in a timely manner.

 

The college budget manager and bursar's office staff meet with admissions and records staff from both campuses bimonthly to discuss problems regarding student enrollment and any problems with the information technology system.

 

9.8The college will strive to establish the recommended classified management position in the bursar's office.

 

The college budget manager, a classified manager and supervisor of the bursar's office, has relocated her office to the student services center near the bursar's office.Besides supervision, the budget manager provides assistance to the bursar's office staff, eliminating the need for an additional classified management position in this area.

 

9.9IVC is not directly involved in the district's financial planning for major emergencies or unforeseen circumstances, and will continue to rely on the district for financial support in these instances.

 

The district maintains a reserve fund of 6.5% of unrestricted funds for economic uncertainties during 2001-2002.This reserve fund provides a safeguard against economic uncertainties such as revenue shortfalls, unexpected repairs, and enrollment declines.

 

STANDARD TEN: Governance and Administration

 

10.2The college will monitor the current administrative organization and, as needed, consider adjust�ments.

 

Upon the recommendation of the college president, the Board has approved the addition of a classified leadership position of registrar in the student services area and the position was filled in August of 2001.

10.3The college will develop methods to ensure the size and composition of the administra�tive staff, including classified leadership, is adequate to support the growth of the college.

 

Please see response to item 10.2, above, page 29.

 

10.4The college will work with the district to review and refine Board Policy 2100.1, consistent with state law and the advice of the state chancellor of community colleges and the state academic senate, in order to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the academic senate in institutional self-governance.

 

This policy is currently under review by the district.

 

10.5The college will explore methods for facilitating faculty participation in govern�ance consistent with the academic employee master agreement.

 

The academic senate and faculty association are represented on the president's council and the chancellor's cabinet.Avenues of communication and participation are available and are utilized as needed.

 

10.6The chancellor will take steps to insure that all faculty and staff are informed about and support the goals, plans, and priorities established for the college.

 

Goals, plans, and priorities are routinely shared with the college faculty and staff.Approximately 75 meetings were held with faculty and staff district-wide in the course of developing the district educational and facilities master plan.

 

10.7The district will develop new job descriptions as needed to delineate how the two reassigned dean positions will serve the district and colleges, and how the emeri�tus program will be administered at the district and college levels.

 

This planning agenda item arose following the reassignment of two deans from the college to the district, prior to the 1998 comprehensive accreditation report: the dean of community relations and executive director of the foundation, and the dean of economic development.The reassignment resulted in both district and college level responsibilities for these deans, prompting the above planning agenda item.

Since that time, these deans have left the district, and the district has provided oversight for the college foundations and the emeritus programs through the creation and staffing of two college level director positions: director, college foundation, and director, emeritus, community and contract education.Revised job descriptions have been created.[27],[28]�� A new director of economic and resource development has assumed the college level duties of the dean of economic development.(Please see response to item 3.2 above, page 17.)

 

 

10.8The chancellor will monitor the effectiveness of communications between the district and college and take corrective actions as necessary to improve the per�ceptions reflected in the survey.

 

The chancellor continues to monitor communications between the district and the college for effectiveness, accuracy, and timeliness.

 

10.9The district will develop a process to facilitate change in a more expedient manner, without sacrificing thorough and inclusive review.

 

During the 2000-2001 academic year a district-wide master planning process was conducted.The Maas Companies and tBP Architecture were engaged as consultants in the development of educational and facilities master planning.All governance groups including students were engaged in this process.A representative steering committee met throughout the year with the consultants.Various questionnaires to campus groups were analyzed and approximately 75 meetings were held with faculty and staff district wide.The early drafts of the master plan emerged in the spring for consideration by all constituents.The steering committee met throughout the summer to refine the plans.Throughout the planning year, the architects provided status reports to the Board of Trustees.The final plans were presented to the Board of Trustees for approval at the October 29 board meeting after first being presented at all-college meetings for review during faculty flex week in August.Furthermore the college now has in place a full-time director of research, planning, and grants, and a director of facilities and maintenance to monitor future progress in this area.

REFERENCES



[1] College Vision and Mission Statements

[2] District Budget Development Guidelines

[3] Job Description for College Budget Manager position

[4] Summary of COPS and Repayment Schedule

[5] Fiscal year 2000-2001 one-time allocations to IVC and Saddleback

[6] Job Description for Director of Research, Planning, and Grants

[7] IRP&G Processes and Products, August 1999 to January 2001

[8] District Educational and Facilities Master Plan (on file in college president's office)

[9] Program Review Process and Evaluation Instrument for Academic Programs

[10] Program Review Instrument for Student Services Programs

[11] Comments by Academic Senate President and Response by College President

[12] Program Review Cycle

[13] Strategic Planning Process (For development of a five-year plan)

[14] Board Policy on Diversity and Nondiscrimination

[15] Please see reference 11, above.

[16] Program Review Instrument for Student Services Programs (Please see Reference 10)

[17] Job Description for Dean of Advanced Technology

[18] Please see reference 11, above.

[19] IRP&G Processes and Products, August 1999 to January 2001 (Please see Reference 7)

[20] Job Description for Director of Economic and Resource Development

[21] Irvine Valley College Major Accomplishments During 2000-2001 Academic Year

[22] Irvine Valley College Program Review, Student Survey Form

[23] Strategic Planning Process (For development of a five-year plan) (Please see Reference 12)

[24]These recommendations are: (1) use our own assessment instrument for English placement for students who apply in person; (2) assign a specific IVC counselor full-time to international students; (3) assign this counselor as foreign student advisor, acting as director of international students; (4) sign agreements that waive TOEFL scores for graduates of certain language schools; (5) provide conditional letters of acceptance for language schools at no cost; and (6) provide more social activities for students and more attention to personal needs.

[25] Final Project Proposal (�FPP�) includes a conceptual design of the proposed building, submitted after state approval of the Initial Project Proposal (�IPP�), which is a one-page submittal assessing the building's compliance with state cost and occupancy standards.

[26] Sample budget development folder

[27] Job description for Director, College Foundation

[28] Job description for Director, Emeritus Institute, Community and Contract Education