STANDARD FIVE

Student Support and Development

 

The institution recruits and admits students appropriate to its programs. It identifies and serves the diverse needs of its students with educational programs and learning support services, and it fosters a supportive learning environment. The entire student pathway through the institutional experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, and success.

 

The Student Services mission statement summarizes the philosophy that drives all student services at Irvine Valley College and is found on the inside cover of the student handbook (5.1). It speaks directly to the issues in Standard 5: Student Support and Development.

 

Student Services Mission Statement

 

The mission of Student Services at IVC is to enable students to successfully reach their personal, professional and educational goals in a friendly, student-centered college environment and to �

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.1 The institution publishes admissions policies consistent with its mission and appropriate to its programs and follows practices that are consistent with those policies.

 

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

The college is one of two independent colleges in the South Orange County Community College District (SOCCCD). Students applying at either IVC or Saddleback College may take classes at either or both campuses. Consistent with its comprehensive mission, IVC maintains an open admission policy (5.2, page 9). Admissions criteria for high school graduates, non-high school graduates, high school students and K-10 students are published in the catalog (5.2, page 8) and schedule (5.3, page 2). Additionally, guidelines regarding applications by non-residents, international (F-1 Visas), military personnel/students, and reclassification (resident status) are found in the catalog (5.2, pages 8-9) and schedule (5.3, page 2).

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

The college publishes admissions policies consistent with its mission and appropriate to its programs and follows practices that are consistent with those policies. The Institutional Effectiveness Survey (5.4) was distributed to approximately 525 IVC faculty and staff members. Of these, 176 actually completed the survey, including 11 administrators; 67 full-time and 47 part-time faculty; 32 full-time and nine part-time classified; and 10 participants who did not indicate their staff affiliation but whose responses were included in the survey results. Of the 144 responses to Item 41 (5.4, Section Three, page 15), 118 (81.9%) agreed that the college "recruits and admits students appropriate to its programs".

PLANNING AGENDA

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

 

5.2 The institution provides to all prospective and currently enrolled students current and accurate information about its programs, admissions policies and graduation requirements, social and academic policies, refund policies, student conduct standards, and complaint and grievance procedures.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

IVC's catalog (5.2) is published annually and has been recognized with numerous awards for its layout, organization and design. It provides comprehensive information concerning the college's programs (page 23), admissions policies (pages 8-9), graduation requirements (pages 17-22 and page 24), social and academic policies (pages 25-30), refund policies (page 15), student conduct standards (page 24), and complaint and grievance procedures (page 24). The catalog is published annually and is available for purchase in the college bookstore. Students who attend the orientation as a part of the

 

matriculation process are encouraged to purchase the catalog. Copies of the catalog, for use by students, are available in the library and in the counseling offices.

 

The schedule of classes (5.3), published each semester and for the summer sessions, also provides information regarding admissions policies (page 2), graduation requirements (pages 79-80), social and academic policies (pages 84-86), and refund policies (page 15). Additionally, the schedule of classes outlines registration (pages 3-12) and matriculation (page 7) procedures. The schedule of classes is available online (http://www.ivc.edu), giving detailed class and instructor information to anyone having Internet access. The schedule of classes is mailed to most residences within the South Orange County Community College District and to all continuing students residing outside the district. They are also available to the public at local libraries and several local area businesses.

 

The student handbook (5.1), published by the Office of Student Services, is distributed to all new students attending orientation and is available to all students at various locations on campus.

 

Counselors provide outreach services at high schools throughout the year, providing information to prospective students (5.5).

 

Matriculation services provide printed information in seven foreign languages to assist non-English speaking students with the application, assessment and registration processes (5.6). Students also receive a packet with general information and course placement information at orientation (5.7) and an "Application for the International Students" packet (5.8) is available to guide these students through the application process.

 

The college has established a Web site (http://www.ivc.edu) that currently provides information on the International Students Office, Extended Opportunities Programs and Services (EOPS), Disabled Student Services and Programs (DSP&S), AmeriCorps and CalWorks (5.9). Other services, including student advising, student activities, clubs and organizations and student government are expected to be added.

 

During the fall and spring semesters, the Student Services News and Information Bulletin is printed weekly with current news about services and programs (5.10). Individual departments publish flyers and brochures to advertise information, policies, requirements, etc. that are unique to their programs or offices (5.11).

 

District policy regarding student conduct standards is published in the schedule of classes (5.3, page 86), the student handbook (5.1, page 27) and more extensively in the college catalog (5.2, page 264). The Campus Safety Office produces a pamphlet, "A Student Guide to Awareness and Campus Safety," (5.12) that discusses the district alcohol and drug possession policy, access to facilities for students and employees, emergency procedures and services offered.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

The student handbook (5.1) is a welcome resource that was initiated during the 1996-1997 academic year. It provides pertinent information in a "student-friendly" format. The student handbook is currently being revised prior to re-publication and a survey of students is being conducted requesting input.

 

The Institutional Effectiveness Survey results show that of the 159 responses received to Item 45 (5.4, Section Three, page 16) 93% agree that "IVC provides accurate information to its students about its programs, policies, procedures, regulations, standards of conduct, expectations and the rights and responsibilities of students". Also, 92% of the 163 responses to Item 25, (5.4, Section Three, page 9) agreed that the catalog provides information that is "accurate and current".

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

 

5.3 The institution identifies the educational support needs of its student population and provides appropriate services and programs to address those needs.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

IVC enrolls approximately 11,000 students each semester. The college has seen a gradual but steady increase in enrollment from fall term to fall term (5.13).

 

Students may identify their needs for information and/or services on the Student Services Survey (5.14) conducted as part of the assessment process during orientations conducted by counselors. Additionally, students often make use of drop-in counseling to further identify areas of need and to seek referral and direction.

 

Irvine Valley was, at one time, an extension site of her sister college, Saddleback College. Many of the services offered to IVC students were identified and began as part of Saddleback College's student services program but have since evolved into independent, unique programs that reflect the philosophy of the college and better serve the needs of IVC students. These programs and services include: Admissions and Records; the Bookstore; the Cafeteria; the Career Center (also part of the School of Guidance and Counseling); the Child Development Center; Guidance and Counseling; the Multicultural Center; the Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS); Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOP&S); the Financial Aid Office; the International Students Office; the Job Placement Office; Matriculation; the Re-entry and Women's Center; Student Development; the Health and Wellness Center; and the Transfer Center (also part of the School of Guidance and Counseling).

 

The Office of Admissions and Records (5.1, page 12) processes applications including assigning assessment and registration appointments at the point of application. This office is also responsible for providing telephone and walk-in registration, maintaining enrollment records, maintaining current and past student academic records and providing enrollment verifications. Admissions and Records distributes, collects and maintains all grade information and attendance records. It processes all transcript requests, maintains incoming academic records from other institutions and processes service requests for EOPS/DSPS. Fee deferrals for financial aid, veterans' waivers, and student petitions are all processed and monitored in Admissions and Records. Students are notified by this office of their academic standing including academic probation status, progress probation status and dismissal status. State apportionment reports are prepared and submitted by this office, and residency determination, AA, AS, IGETC, and CSU evaluations and certification are handled here. Finally, Admissions and Records, with the Office of Student Services, coordinates the commencement ceremony and orders and distributes diplomas.

 

The college bookstore (5.1, page 12 and 5.3, page 74) stocks new and used textbooks, class supplies and a variety of educational materials, including dictionaries and computer software. Used textbooks are bought back year round at up to 50% of their purchased price. Duplicated educational materials prepared by the instructors are also available for purchase at the bookstore as well as various sundries and numerous IVC logo accessories. The bookstore is generally open Monday through Friday with the exact hours printed in the schedule of classes for each semester. A portion of its earning go to the Associated Students of Irvine Valley College (ASIVC), which in turn uses that money to help fund various activities on campus.

 

The Cafeteria (The Laser Café) (5.1, page 12) is located in the Student Services Center and is currently operated by Total Food Management. A variety of breakfast, lunch and dinner items are available daily. The food service operator can also provide catering for campus events.

 

The Career Center (5.1, page 13 and 5.2, page 33) provides comprehensive career development services and resources to assist students and community members in making informed decisions about their career goals. Students are assisted through the career development process by a counselor and the career guidance officer who provide current labor market, occupational and job search information. Individual career counseling is available in the Career Center as well as information through the Career Center News and Information Newsletter (5.15), the EUREKA Computerized Career Information System, and a video library. Classroom visitations and career center orientations provided in Applied Psychology 100 and 102 classes (5.2, pages 58-59) introduce the services of the Career Center to a broad cross section of students. The Career Center also sponsors various workshops on such topics as choosing a major/career, career transition, career researching, networking and informational interviewing, resume writing and interviewing. Furthermore, speakers are regularly invited to make presentations representing a wide range of occupations.

 

Opened in 1993, the Child Development Center (5.1, page 13, 5.2, page 33, and 5.3, page 75) is housed in a state of the art facility located in the southwest corner of the campus. The Center provides children of IVC students with a discount and priority registration. Children from the community at large are welcome and comprise the largest number of children enrolled at the Center. The Center is open from 7 AM to 6 PM Monday through Friday. Full day and part day programs are available.

 

The Child Development Center is in the process of completing its self-study in preparation for an accreditation visit. The program provides a model lab school for students of Early Childhood Education where they can see quality child care in action by observing in classes, volunteering their time and participating in practicum classes.

 

The School of Guidance and Counseling (5.1, page 13, 5.2, page 32, and 5.3, page 74) offers personal, career and academic counseling to all students. While academic counseling is in highest demand, students may receive personal and/or crisis counseling when requested or required. Three of the counselors are licensed marriage, family and child therapists and one of the adjunct faculty is a licensed clinical psychologist. Career counseling is provided in conjunction with the counselor who coordinates the Career Center, and transfer students are encouraged to meet with counselors in the Counseling Center and/or the Transfer Center. Both centers work closely with counselors to provide specialized counseling when appropriate. Specialized counseling is also provided to athletes, international students, English as a Second Language students, students on probation and students undecided about their educational goals. Underrepresented students may participate in special activities and receive specialized counseling via the MTE program (Making Transfer Easy).

 

Students may make 30-minute appointments to meet with a counselor privately or may make use of "drop-in" counseling, where counselors are available to answer questions on a first come, first serve basis (5.2, page 33). Counselors also conduct orientations as part of matriculation where they interpret student's assessment scores and assist them in selecting first semester classes.

 

In addition to providing counseling services, the counselors teach applied psychology (5.2, pages 58-59) and women's studies (5.2, pages 198-199) courses. The applied psychology classes are designed to help students increase their academic success and retention in college. Research conducted by the college has demonstrated that successful completion of Applied Psychology 100, College Success, significantly contributes to the college success of students (5.16).

 

The Counseling department has traditionally taken the lead in coordinating and providing outreach services to high schools. Coordination of such events as the High School Guidance Conference and Senior Day has come directly from the resources of the Counseling department. A new High School Outreach Task Force has begun to examine the institution's responsibility vis-à-vis recruitment and outreach and this year the Counseling department plans an emphasis on outreach counseling.

 

The Multicultural Center has only recently come into existence and is currently assigned to share space with the Women's and Re-entry Center. Currently, a faculty member is selected as the Multicultural Center Officer, whose assignment is for a two-year term and carries a $2,500.00 per semester stipend. The Multicultural Center Officer reports directly to the college president and is in the process of developing a plan of action that will include establishing an advisory committee, speaker series, film series and exhibiting cultural artifacts, books and other related items in the library display cases. These activities and multicultural programs are currently operated out of the academic office of the Multicultural Center Officer. The purpose of the Multicultural Center is to develop a better understanding of the diverse backgrounds among the college community. Unfortunately, establishment of an operational Multicultural Center capable of staffing employees and holding regular operating hours is still largely symbolic due to an undetermined funding base.

 

The Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSP&S) (5.1, page 15, 5.2, page 34, and 5.3, page 76) offers services for disabled students and learning disabled students, provides specialized instruction and classroom accommodations and maintains liaisons with local agencies. It is a support service that is designed to provide all qualified disabled students with services and resources they need to reduce educational barriers. Accommodations include classroom modifications, extended counseling, priority registration, test proctoring and tutoring. Instructional opportunities include adaptive classes in college orientation, study skills, computer skills, and physical education. Specialized instruction is offered for students with learning disabilities in English, reading and math.

 

The Extended Opportunity Program and Services (EOPS) and Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE) (5.1, page 16, 5.2, page 34, and 5.3, page 76) programs focus on the recruitment of underrepresented and at-risk students from local high schools and agencies such as the Department of Social Services. A primary goal of the program is to increase student retention and persistence in the hope of assisting students to successfully transition into the world of work or to transfer to the university. The EOPS/CARE program provides services including but not limited to counseling, financial assistance, coordinating services with local agencies, tutoring, sponsoring university field trips and monitoring students' progress. Particularly noteworthy are the book loan program, the college's Adopt-A-Family program, the emergency loan program, the work-study program and special services provided through the CARE program for Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients including loans for car repairs, child care, coordinating services with local housing authorities and with the Children's Home Society.

 

IVC is committed to providing financial aid to students with a demonstrated need. The Financial Aid Office at IVC provides information and advisement regarding the way in which students may qualify for a grant, loan, the college work-study program and/or emergency loans. Financial assistance programs currently offered through IVC include the Board of Governors Fee Waivers, Bureau of Indian Affairs Grants, the California Grant Program, the College Work Study, the Emergency Loan Program, EOPS Grants, Pell Grants, Stafford Study Loans, Unsubsidized Loans and Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (5.1, page 16, 5.2, page 31, and 5.3, page 74).

 

The Financial Aid Office through its Veterans Program (5.1, page 74 and 5.2, page 31) provides assistance to veterans in attaining their educational goals. A veteran's affairs specialist provides specific information to veterans, their dependents, orphans and widows regarding the types of benefits for which they may be eligible.

 

The IVC Scholarship program is administered through the Financial Aid Office and IVC Foundation Office. In 1996-97, the Foundation raised a total of $90,000 and ASIVC provided $10,000 for scholarships (5.17, page 14). A total of $75,000 in scholarships were awarded to 150 students (5.17, page 14).

 

In July 1995, IVC made a commitment to provide expanded and improved services to international students as demonstrated by the creation of an International Student Office (5.1, page 17 and 5.2, page 45). There has been a gradual but steady increase in international student enrollment from fall of 1991 to fall of 1997 (5.18).

 

The International Student Office assists students with social security information, housing, immigration issues, and INS regulations as well as processing applications to the college, preparing documents related to visas, on/off campus employment, transfer to other colleges, deferment of fee payments and permission for concurrent enrollment at other colleges. This office also provides information to students regarding their rights and responsibilities regarding foreign student status.

 

The purpose of the Job Placement Center (5.1, page 18, 5.2, page 32, and 5.3, page 75) is to help current and past IVC students secure employment related to their career goals and/or to assist students to secure employment to fulfill their immediate financial needs. The Job Placement Center maintains the Jobtrak, a computerized job network that catalogues available jobs throughout Orange County. The Center provides assistance in writing resumes, with an emphasis on students from technical/vocational programs, and also sponsors workshops on job search and interviewing techniques as well as a Job Fair. All on-campus recruiting by community employers is coordinated through the Job Placement Center.

 

Matriculation Services (5.2, page 12 and 5.3, page 7) conducts assessment testing during which basic skills are evaluated and students are asked to identify their goals and interests. Students then attend an orientation session and receive advice from a counselor about selecting classes and planning a program. The primary goal of this process is to help students complete their educational goals. In 1996-97, 3,921 students took assessment tests and 3,676 attended an orientation session in the Assessment Center (5.17, page 8). All components of this program have been designed to satisfy the requirements of the California State Board of Governors legislation governing student access to and successful completion of programs in the community college.

 

The Re-entry and Women's Center (5.1, page 19, 5.2, page 33, and 5.3, page 76) exists to meet the many and varied needs of new and returning students, staff, faculty, and community members. A primary goal of the center is to encourage and support re-entry students and women in their educational, professional, and personal growth, and at the same time promote an understanding of the changing roles of men and women.

 

The Associated Students of Irvine Valley College (ASIVC) (5.1, page 19, 5.2, page 36, and 5.3, page 76), is recognized as the official governing body for students and establishes an organized voice at the college. It participates in the shared governance structure of the college through membership on collegewide committees (5.19). It is a program designed to educate students to be responsible leaders and provide them with the opportunities to develop and enhance their leadership skills. The Student Development Office encourages club awareness and provides support to faculty advisors as well as encouraging students to sponsor activities and events that promote a positive campus climate.

 

The Health and Wellness Center (5.1, page 16, 5.2, page 33, and 5.3, page 75) provides many services to students to support its goal of educating students regarding the ways in which they can achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, thereby enabling them to successfully complete their educational goals. The center works to educate students regarding the importance of being responsible for their own health. A physician is on campus regularly to provide medical services and emergency medical care is available on campus for illness or injury. Services provided include gynecological exams and birth control information, requests for over-the-counter medications, immunizations, lab services, attention for acute illnesses and blood pressure readings.

 

For students considering transfer to a university, the Transfer Center (5.1, page 20, 5.2, page 32, and 5.3, page 74) is the "library" or resource center where students can conduct the necessary research to make important decisions. It is a primary goal of the center to provide accurate and timely information within the context of a comfortable, inviting and accessible facility. The Transfer Center sponsors college representative visits, college fairs, and workshops relevant to transferring. Resources include college catalogs, comparison guides to colleges, and computer software such as CollegeSource and Project Pathways. Scholarship/Financial Aid information, articulation agreements and the bi-annual newsletter Transfer Talk are all available to students in the Transfer Center as well.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

In the continuing effort to identify the needs of students and provide appropriate services and programs, new information systems software is being developed by Buzzeo, Inc., under contract with the SOCCCD. As part of this project, the existing student information systems will be replaced with a comprehensive and fully-integrated system that, among other features, will allow for a wide variety of tracking mechanisms as described in the "Features Representation Document for the Student Tracking Focus Group Session" (5.20). This new information system was developed through the use of focus groups that included representation from both colleges and the district and is expected to be in operation sometime in fall 1998. It is expected that this information system will provide Admissions and Records, the Career Center, the Counseling Center, Financial Aid and matriculation with sophisticated student-services-oriented software that will enhance evaluation in these departments, ultimately improving effectiveness.

IVC began testing and implementation of a student photo identification system during summer 1998 with ID cards expected to be issued to students in mid-September 1998. In addition to providing photo identification, the system will also allow IVC to track use of services such as Counseling, Health and Wellness Center, and other services available to students. While the tracking system will provide valuable data on the demand for services, in order to protect the confidentiality of students it will not generate personal student data.

 

Counselors present a two-hour orientation to all new incoming students. The Counseling staff is currently reviewing the content and quality of the orientation sessions in order to continue to provide meaningful, timely information. All new students are encouraged to enroll in an orientation to college course (Applied Psychology 100) during their first semester. Counselors are beginning to work to improve the programs for probation and undecided students and to refine their orientation presentations.

 

Since our last accreditation visit, IVC has been successful in establishing its own Financial Aid Office independent from Saddleback College resulting in IVC students being serviced more quickly and efficiently. A classified manager and several financial aid technicians were hired to service this area. The demand for financial aid has increased dramatically (5.21). However, lack of adequate staff has required that the office close for some hours during the week in order that staff be able to process the requests received. This has reduced student access to the Financial Aid Office.

 

The Job Placement Center sets high goals for itself in its desire to assist students in securing employment (5.22).

 

A noteworthy aspect of the follow-up component of matriculation is the Early Alert Retention System (5.23) developed by IVC. All first semester students, as well as students in the DSP&S and EOP&S programs, are tracked each semester. The Matriculation Advisory Committee has updated the college's Matriculation Plan (5.24) to incorporate additional follow-up strategies.

 

The Student Services Survey (5.14) provides students with the opportunity to select from a list of student services from which they would like to receive information and/or assistance (for example, financial aid, counseling, EOPS, etc.). At this time, due to the lack of adequate technology and software, this information is only collected and not acted upon. It is expected that the Buzzeo system and the hiring of a dean of research, planning and resource development (see Standard Three, A.2) will improve this situation.

 

The recently established Multicultural Center has begun its efforts to further understanding of diverse cultures by a display of Persian books and cultural artifact during Persian New Year in March; a display of multicultural books and artifacts in April; and a multicultural event sponsored by the IVC Chemistry Club on April 30, 1998.

 

The Re-entry and Women's Center is currently in the process of applying for a New Horizons grant and will use CalWORKS and TANF funding to address the problems of a lack of funding for staff.

 

The Transfer Center has blossomed into one of the most accessible and used services on campus with transfer programs the stated goal of 4,491 students (41%) (5.25). Representatives from four-year colleges are completely booked with appointments days before they arrive on campus for scheduled Transfer Days and Mini-Fairs (5.26).

 

Of the 143 responses to Item 42 of the Institutional Effectiveness Survey, 109 (76.2%) agree that IVC has accurately identified the diverse needs of the students it serves and 126 of the 149 responses (85.6%) to Item 43 agree that IVC provides appropriate educational support services and programs to address the needs of the college's diverse student population (5.4, Section Three, pages 15 and 16). Also, 70.2% (127 of 160 responses) to Item 36 agreed that the college "meets the specific instructional needs of the culturally diverse student body" (5.4, Section Three, page 14). In addition, 76.9% of the 78 responses to Item 54 (5.4, Section Three, page 19) agree that "[t]he library adequately supports special services students."

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

 

5.4 The institution involves students, as appropriate, in planning and evaluating

student support and development services.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

The bulk of planning in Student Services is done within the individual service units and via Student Services Council (5.27). Since many of the services are driven by federal or state laws that mandate procedures and outcomes, professional staff who implement these services are the primary planners.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

Students are represented on committees including but not limited to the Matriculation Advisory Committee, President's Council, the Program Review Committee, and the Accreditation Self Study. Each academic school also has two student senators who serve as liaisons between the school and ASIVC.

 

Although an overall plan of systematic evaluation for each area of Student Services has yet to be developed, progress has been made in a few areas. In the area of Matriculation, students fill out evaluations of the group orientation session (5.28). In the Counseling area, randomly selected students fill out specific evaluation forms giving feedback on their individual counseling appointments (5.29). In the Supportive Services area, all EOPS students fill out an exit survey form in their last semester at IVC (5.30). Also, at specific times of the year, all students using Supportive Services fill out an evaluation form for the staff member who worked with them (5.31).

Attempts to involve students on committees and in planning has resulted in inconsistent student representation. Community college students, traditionally a high percentage of whom are employed or have other commitments, may be reluctant to make the additional time commitments required to serve on committees.

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

 

5.5 Admissions and assessment instruments and placement practices are designed to minimize test and other bias and are regularly evaluated to assure effectiveness.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

IVC offers a comprehensive, unbiased assessment process (5.1, page 12, 5.2, page 12, and 5.3, page 7) to all students including matriculation-exempt students who wish to be assessed. Assessment instruments are administered to determine student competency in reading, writing, mathematics and English as a Second Language skills. The primary goal of this process is to increase the extent to which students complete their educational objectives by providing information about their skills and abilities; by identifying support services; and by offering students the opportunity to plan their educational programs in consultation with counselors and faculty. The assessment, orientation, and advisement components of this program have been designed to satisfy the requirements of the California State Board of Governors legislation governing student access to, and successful completion of, programs at IVC.

 

Based on information taken from the IVC application (5.32), students are notified at the time of application whether they should participate in matriculation or are exempt from doing so. The criteria used to determine students' matriculation status is based on the exemption policy adopted by the Board of Trustees (5.2, page 12, 5.3, page 7, and 5.33). Answers from the application are used to determine whether students sit for a native English assessment or an English as a Second Language assessment. If students are concerned about which assessment they should take (native English or ESL), the Assessment Center staff can advise them regarding the appropriate assessment.

 

All students sitting for the native English assessment are asked to complete the Student Services Survey (5.14), the Nelson-Denny Reading Test, the Descriptive Tests of Language Skills in Sentence Structure, the Descriptive Tests of Language Skills in Critical Reasoning and one of four sections of the Math Diagnostic Testing Project (MDTP) (Algebra Readiness, Elementary Algebra, Intermediate Algebra, or Pre Calculus). A Writing Sample is also available to provide further evidence of a student's writing skill. Recommended course placements in reading, writing and math are based on the results of these tests in conjunction with several other measures. These measures include earned high school GPA, the highest math course completed, and the number of units the student plans to enroll in during the first term. These measures are gathered from questions that appear on the Student Services Survey.

 

ESL students are asked to complete the Secondary Level English Proficiency (SLEP) test. An ESL Writing Sample was developed, piloted and approved by the Chancellor's office and it has been determined that the combination of the SLEP and the ESL Writing Sample produce a more meaningful, precise placement for new ESL students. At this time, all ESL course recommendations are advisory.

 

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

All assessment instruments in use have received full approval by the California Community College Chancellor's Office. In order to receive full approval, a test must be proven valid, reliable and unbiased. With the exception of the Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Project (MDPT), IVC has taken the responsibility for validating all test instruments. The use of the MDPT requires that students self-select into an appropriate math level assessment that can result in inappropriate placement. Math faculty and the matriculation coordinator/researcher are in the process of developing a "homegrown" assessment instrument that will, hopefully, more accurately place students into mathematics courses and will eliminate the need for students to choose from one of four different math tests.

 

The English faculty and matriculation coordinator/researcher are continually monitoring the writing assessment instruments to ensure placements are accurate and unbiased. Based on such evaluations, a new course, Writing 301, (5.2, page 111) was created in summer 1997 to accommodate students with special writing needs.

 

Of the 156 responses to Item 44 (5.4, Section Three, page 16), 84.6% agree that "concern for student access, progress and success characterizes students' educational experience at the college."

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

5.6 The institution provides appropriate, comprehensive, reliable and accessible services to its students regardless of service location or delivery method.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

Location of most student services in one building has assisted students in recognizing the many support services available at IVC. All student services are open Monday through Friday but the hours, both for day and evening, vary from service to service.

 

IVC off-campus programs provide for the needs of three distinct student populations: Marine Corps personnel, Emeritus (mature adults) and the high school outreach students. While off-campus sites do not have immediate access to the student services and resources provided on campus, all students are welcome to use the campus services. IVC does provide a part-time (twice a week) counselor at the El Toro Marine Corps Base to assist Marine Corps personnel. The base is scheduled to close December 31, 1999.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

To improve student access for all students, the college should address the scheduling of uniform hours of operations for student services. The college might consider a "needs assessment" to define expansion and allocation of resources. More cross-service training might help existing services to better understand the functions of all student services, thereby providing better access to the students.

 

Of the 154 respondents to Item 46 of the Survey (5.4, Section Three, page 17), 87% agree that "Student Services provides appropriate, comprehensive, reliable and accessible services to its students".

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

1. The college will, through the shared governance policy, research the implementation of a policy of uniform operating hours for all student services.

 

5.7 The institution, in keeping with its mission, creates and maintains a campus climate which serves and supports its diverse student population.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

Irvine Valley College strives to provide an open, friendly, and comfortable campus environment. The IVC Student Success Plan (5.36) sets forth strategies to encourage student success through improved access, course completion, basic skills and transfer. The Student Services Center contributes to this environment by being centrally located on campus and housing the majority of student services programs in one building. These programs support, encourage, and promote a diverse and positive environment for all students. As an example, many bilingual staff members are available to assist students including those who speak Spanish, Farsi, and Vietnamese. Information flyers about application to the college, matriculation and registration are available in seven foreign languages (5.6). The Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSP&S) is "designed to provide all qualified disabled students with the services and resources they need to reduce educational barriers" (5.1, page 15). The Extended Opportunity Program and Services (EOPS) is "designed to help qualified economically and educationally disadvantaged students to successfully complete their educational goals" (5.1, page 16). Greater Avenues to Independence program (GAIN) provides assistance for students on AFDC/TANF and counsels and directs students into training programs (5.1, page 16). The GAIN program has since been replaced by a combination AmeriCorps, CalWORKs, New Horizons and the CARE programs (5.9).

 

There are a number of clubs and activities that promote awareness and appreciation of different cultures and ethnic groups. These clubs include but are not limited to the MECHA, Vietnamese/Asian Club, Gay and Lesbian Club, Challengers Club (disabled students), Chinese Cultural Association, and EOPS/CARE Club (disadvantaged and single parents) (5.37). These clubs have presented a variety of cultural and informational events on campus including Cinco de Mayo and Dia de Los Muertos celebrations, Chinese New Year events and disability awareness workshops. The college is in the beginning stages of establishing a Multicultural Center in order to promote cultural awareness and improve campus climate.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

The 321 students responding to the Campus Climate Survey (5.35) reflected their level of satisfaction with the following services based on a point scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree): 2.87 (Disabled Students); 2.85 (EOP&S); 2.80 (Veterans Affairs); 2.68 (Student Clubs); 2.65 (Financial Aid); and 2.52 (Foreign Student Services).

 

The International Student Office is currently in need of additional staff and support services. This program needs a broad base of support from administration, faculty, staff and students. A single, ongoing advisory committee might best garner this support.

 

Of the 149 respondents to Item 43 of the Institutional Effectiveness Survey (5.4, Section Three, page 16), 84.5% agreed that "Student Services provides appropriate educational support services and programs to address the needs of the college's diverse student population. Additionally, of the 160 responses to Item 47 (5.4, Section Three, page 17), 78.6% agree that the college "creates and maintains a campus climate which services and supports its diverse student population".

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

  1. The college will consider establishing an International Student Advisory Committee to develop a comprehensive program of services commensurate with the needs of its population.

 

    1. The institution supports a co-curricular environment that fosters intellectual, ethical, and personal development for all its students and encourages personal and civic responsibility.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

IVC has numerous co-curricular programs. In spring and fall of 1997, there were 18 active student organizations on campus (5.36). If students are interested in starting a new club, established procedures are in place to support them (5.37). The programs and activities available represent different aspects of students' interests with considerable opportunity for students to find something to their liking. Co-curricular programs include but are not limited to Chinese Cultural Association, Christian Club, Dance Club, the Psi Beta Honor Society, Political Science Club, and the Journalism Club.

 

The Associated Students of Irvine Valley College (ASIVC) is recognized as the official governing body for students and provides leadership training and governance experiences to its members. It also sponsors scholarships and promotes, coordinates and supports other campus organizations.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

Co-curricular programs and events occur year round. While some of the events serve as fundraisers, other events are held solely to promote and support students' welfare. Each fall and spring, a "Club Day" is held. ASIVC also sponsors "Welcome Day" in order to welcome students back to school and ASIVC and the Health and Wellness Center sponsor "Play Day," to help students relieve stress before final examinations. There is also an American Red Cross blood drive each semester.

 

Cultural awareness is promoted by many clubs. For example, MECHA sponsors a celebration for Mexican Independence Day and the Chinese Cultural Association celebrates the Moon Festival and Chinese New Year and sponsors an "Asian Food Festival." The Geology Club has sponsored one-day hiking expeditions and a field trip to the La Brea Tar Pits. The Challenger's Club has held a clothing drive, the Earth Club sponsors Earth Day awareness activities and the Political Science Club has established a Model United Nations program.

In addition to the on-campus events, co-curricular programs compete in regional and national competitions within their fields. Many have received national recognition including The Voice (the student newspaper), the Psi Beta Honor Society and the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. This track record is quite remarkable considering that IVC became an independent college only in 1985.

 

ASIVC represents the student perspective on such college committees as the Budget and Operations Committee (5.19, page 2), the Committee on Courses (5.19, page 4), the Facilities and Capital Improvement Committee (5.19, page 3), and the Student Affairs Committee (5.19, page 3). The president of ASIVC serves on the President's Council (5.19, page 6).

 

Of the 142 responses to Item 48 of the Institutional Effectiveness Survey (5.4, Section Three, page 17), 71.8% agreed that the college "supports an extracurricular environment for all its students that fosters intellectual and personal development as well as encourages personal and civic responsibility.

 

5.9 Student records are maintained permanently, securely, and confidentially with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the form in which those files are maintained.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

All student records since IVC's initial accreditation in 1989 are maintained in hard copy form in the Office of Admissions and Records. They are stored in either a locked, fireproof file room or locked file cabinets. Access to the records is restricted to Admissions and Records personnel only. All records have been and are being maintained permanently in hard copy form until a reliable means of electronic storage becomes available. Confidentiality of student records in the Office of Admissions and Records is maintained according to Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA, 34 C.F.R. Part 99) regulations. Documents used in the Office of Admissions and Records, which contain personal information from the student database, are shredded and disposed of securely.

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

The lack of adequate, secured and fireproof storage space for permanent records is a problem. Existing physical space has become inadequate making the retrieval and accessibility of archived records extremely difficult. An additional file room was built by enclosing the area under the stairwell outside of the Admissions Office; however, it did not provide enough space to meet the need. Although scanning documents will help simplify retrieval, the need for additional space will remain a priority.

 

It has been the practice to allow authorized personnel from departments other than Admissions and Records to have access to student transcripts received from other institutions. This has led to problems with items being misfiled or improperly discarded, therefore, there are concerns regarding the lack of confidentiality of student files. Counselors expressed some concern regarding the chain of custody for student transcripts received from other colleges. The goal is to make these documents available for viewing by other authorized departments online once the scanning process is completed. In the interim, alternate means of transcript retrieval need to be explored and implemented.

Proper disposal of photocopied student records is a security issue. It may be beneficial to provide an inservice to other student services personnel regarding the importance of securely disposing of these documents and an overview of FERPA regulations.

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

  1. The college will research strategies for the secure handling of student transcripts from other colleges.

2. The college will develop and implement procedures to ensure confidentiality and safety of student files.

 

5.10 The institution systematically evaluates the appropriateness, adequacy, and effectiveness of its Student Services and uses the results of the evaluation as a basis for improvement.

 

DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

 

In 1996-1997, the Program Review Committee began developing a pilot plan for program review for all college programs. The Health and Wellness Center was the first student service to volunteer to pilot the program review process (5.38). It was subsequently determined that the program review instrument, geared towards instructional programs, could not be used to evaluate effectively the Health and Wellness Center or other student services programs. The Program Review Committee reviewed and revised the handbook in February 1998 to broaden the handbook's applicability to all college programs. When the Academic Senate approves this revised Program Review Handbook, the student services program review calendar (5.39) will be updated and all services will be reviewed on schedule.

 

Although an overall plan of systematic evaluation for each area of Student Services has yet to be implemented, progress has been made in a few areas. In the area of Matriculation, students fill out evaluations of the group orientation session (5.28). In the Counseling area, randomly selected students fill out specific evaluation forms giving feedback on their individual counseling appointments (5.29). In the Supportive Services area, all EOPS students fill out an exit survey form in their last semester at IVC (5.30). Also, at specific times of the year, all students using Supportive Services fill out an evaluation form for the staff member who worked with them (5.31).

 

SELF-EVALUATION

 

New information systems software is being developed by Buzzeo, Inc., under contract with the South Orange County Community College District. As part of this project, the existing student information systems will be replaced with a comprehensive and fully-integrated system that, among other features, will allow for a wide variety of tracking mechanisms as described in the "Features Representation Document for the Student Tracking Focus Group Session" (5.20). This new information system was developed through the use of focus groups that included representation from both colleges and the district and is expected to be in operation sometime in fall 1998. It is expected that this information system will provide admissions and records, the career center, the counseling center, financial aid and matriculation with sophisticated student-services-oriented software that will enhance evaluation in these departments and increase effectiveness.

IVC also began the testing and implementation of a student photo identification system during summer 1998 with ID cards expected to be issued to students in mid-September 1998. In addition to providing photo identification, the system will also allow IVC to track use of services such as Counseling, Health and Wellness Center, and other services available to students. While the tracking system will provide valuable data on the demand for services, in order to protect the confidentiality of students it will not generate personal student data.

 

PLANNING AGENDA

 

No changes are recommended at this time.

 

 

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION

STANDARD FIVE

 

    1. IVC Student Handbook
    2. 1997-98 IVC Catalog
    3. IVC Schedule of Classes, Spring 1998
    4. Institutional Effectiveness Survey
    5. IVC Information Folder
    6. Samples of Matriculation Foreign Language Flyers
    7. Orientation Brochure
    8. Application for the International Students
    9. Student Services Pages From The Web
    10. Sample of Student Services News and Information Bulletin
    11. Samples of Department Flyers/Brochures
    12. A Student Guide to Awareness and Campus Safety
    13. Enrollment Report
    14. Student Services Survey
    15. Career Center News and Information Newsletter
    16. AP 100 Research
    17. Irvine Valley College and Foundation Annual Report, 1996-97
    18. International Student Statistics
    19. IVC College Governance � Standing Committees
    20. Features Representation Document for the Student Tracking Focus Group Session
    21. Financial Aid Statistics
    22. Job Placement Statistics
    23. An Evaluation of Several Early Alert Strategies for Helping First Semester Freshmen at the Community College and a Description of the Newly Developed Early Alert Retention System (EARS) Software. Sample of an Early Alert Form
    24. 1997-98 Matriculation Plan
    25. Student Educational Goals
    26. Transfer Day Flyer
    27. Sample of Student Services Council Meeting Minutes
    28. Matriculation Student Evaluation
    29. Counseling Student Evaluation
    30. EOPS Student Exit Survey
    31. Supportive Services Student Evaluation Form
    32. IVC Application
    33. Matriculation Exemption/Participation Criteria
    34. Student Success Plan
    35. Campus Climate Survey, July 1995
    36. List of ASIVC Clubs
    37. ASIVC Procedures for Establishing a New Club
    38.  

      SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION

      STANDARD FIVE

       

    39. Health and Wellness Center Program Review
    40. Student Services Program Review Cycle